Tag Archives: holistic health

Spring Has Sprung!

CATS everywhere are yowling for attention…the females are restless and the boys are a ’fightin’. Even your spayed and neutered felines are feeling the fun in the air. I have had a few early fighters in my practice already, with small abscess repairs and a not-so-fun week of confinement with that embarrassing e-collar….

Be aware that it is far better to build a “catio,” or other large wired-in area for your kitties, so they can safely play “wildcat” without the associated risk. Along with cat-fights, the risks on the rise as it gets sunnier include coyote predators, owls, bobcats and of course, cars driven by happy teens out for spring and summer fun.

If you must let your kitty wander the ‘hood during the day, please have them in for supper (theirs) by about 5 pm, before dusk descends. If you notice your pet lying around, a little quiet, or subdued, often they have a developing abscess somewhere that just hasn’t demanded your attention yet. It’s best to really feel around for a sore spot on kitty’s body so you can detect that swelling before it gets too big or-yuck-ruptures.

Lastly, let’s talk about restless DOGS and spring. Most of you responsible pet owners have spayed and neutered dogs. But for other reasons, dogs too, want to really get out there and run and play and sniff our (finally) abundant, post-rain grass!

With all of that drive and activity, you may start to notice more knee and elbow strains in the more active pups, and joint stiffness and pronounced limping in those older “weekend warrior” canines. We have been using several amazing ALL-NATURAL products that are REVERSING JOINT DISEASE, REMOVING INFLAMMATION FROM THE JOINTS AND BONES, and doing a little general reverse aging as well. (I’m in for the human version….). Call and ask today about BIOCELL, EXCEL CAMELINA OIL, AND VETSMART HIP AND JOINT…remember, pure, clean, and 95% absorbed the minute it passes their doggy lips!

Let’s keep the SPRING in your pet’s steps this Spring!

Home Remedies 101

Over the next few weeks I’ll be sharing some of my most valuable home remedies for pet health that can keep your dog’s tail wagging and kitty purring. These tips will help you to gauge when to call your integrative vet.

Sick dogs often show a lack of appetite and energy, restlessness, panting, or inactivity. If you suspect that your pet is not feeling well, you may want to take his temperature at home to gather information about symptoms of illness. Unlike humans, dogs will not show the same signs of having an elevated temperature, such as warm skin or shivering. Therefore, it is important to learn how to take a dog’s temperature to get an idea how high his or her fever is and to possibly see a veterinarian.

Part 1 – Taking your pet’s temperature at home.

When taking your pet’s temperature at home use LOTS of water-soluble lube (like KY) and use a digital thermometer available from your local pet store.. And if you have your partner or friend close by that is a big help too.

Lubricate the thermometer.

Holding the thermometer in your dominant hand (which should be near the dog’s tail end), dip the end of the thermometer in the lubricant.

Lift the dog’s tail.

Use your non-dominant hand (eg. your left hand if you are right-handed) to grasp the base of the dog’s tail and lift it up. You should firmly but gently lift up on the dog’s tail, exposing the dog’s anus. Be careful with females to place the thermometer in the right hole (top one ☺)

Hold the thermometer parallel

To the dog’s long axis, holding the thermometer horizontal and pointing from tail to head. Keeping the thermometer in this position, touch the end of the thermometer to the anus.

Take the dog’s temperature.

If you are using a digital thermometer, you will need to push the button on the shaft of the thermometer to turn it on. Push it again to begin taking the dog’s temperature.

The display will likely flash or you will see the temperature increasing while you take the dog’s temperature.
Wait between 5 and 60 seconds, depending upon the thermometer. When you hear the thermometer beep, or if the temperature has leveled off and is remaining steady, you are finished.

Mistakes can be caused if there is poop in the area, which can make the reading lower and also not getting the thermometer in far enough can also result in a false reading.

General temperature in normal range for dogs is 99.5 – 102.5. If it’s over 103.2 you should retake and if it persists or goes up then you should see your veterinarian right away.

Low temperatures can occur in old, debilitated and critically ill animals. A 98.5 or lower is cause for concern in a normal animal.

Again always do a second reading in case it may be a “user error” and save you a trip to your vet.

** All of the above rules apply to taking your dogs temperature.

If you try and take your cat’s temperature YOU may be the one going to the hospital!

Wishing you much love, light and health,

Dr. Tiffany Margolin

Dr. Tiffany Margolin posing with a dog